Wednesday, July 1, 2009

All Passion Spent by Vita Sackville-West, 18/81

Lady Slane spent her entire life as a politician's wife, raising six children. In the wake of her husband's death she finally has time and space to attend to her own desires. At age eighty-eight Lady Slane chooses to move to her own home, and surround herself with persons of her own choosing. And what Lady Slane chooses to do is to reminisce about her life, from her marriage in 1860 to the present day. Lady Slane's children presume that their mother has descended into madness, but she holds her ground, refusing to become the doddering widow her children expect. In this novel we learn Lady Slane's history: her thwarted dreams of becoming an artist, her love for her husband, and the restrictions incumbent on Victorian political wives. The book culminates as Lady Slane faces an awakening of unexpected passion. This is a dark and contemplative novel, though there are elements of comedy as well. The Slane children all fit into comic stereotypes, and perform their allotted roles to the point of ridiculousness. These comic elements are necessary, they allow Lady Slane to be sensible, rather than cruel, in cutting herself off from her children at the end of her life. Lady Slane's long life spans the Victorian and Edwardian periods, and if the hallmark of the Victorian era was change, than Lady Slane is certainly a good model thereof. She lived through modernization, the growth of empire, and in her reflections we see the long span of her life.
Vita Sackville-West, All Passion Spent (The Dial Press, 1984) ISBN: 0385279760
Category: Virago Modern Classics, 4/9, 18/81


Tina said...

Laurie...I almost couldn't believe my eyes when I saw your post. I'd never heard of Sackville-West until about 5 hours ago. I was cataloging some old (like 1936 pub date!)books this morning, we inherited them, and Vic Sacville-West has a biography of Joan of Arc that really looks fascinating. Small world.

Laurie said...

Awesome- enjoy them!